10-Minute Arrabbiata Sauce Recipe | Kitchen Infinity Recipes

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To make the perfect 10-Minute Arrabbiata Sauce we've included ingredients and directions for you to easily follow. The total time to make this recipe will be 30 min. You will need a prep time of approximately 20 min and a cook time of 10 min. This 10-Minute Arrabbiata Sauce will produce enough food for 8 servings.

Depending on your culture or family tradition there can be multiple variations for making this 10-Minute Arrabbiata Sauce recipe. Once you've read through and familiarize yourself with our recommended ingredients and directions, you can add your own twist to this recipe to make it your own! We've included a list of potential cookware or bakeware items below that might be necessary for this 10-Minute Arrabbiata Sauce recipe.

10-Minute Arrabbiata Sauce Ingredients

  • 2 Tbsp. olive oil
  • 1 Tbsp. finely chopped garlic
  • 1/8 to 1/4 tsp. crushed red pepper flakes
  • 1 jar Bertolli® Tomato & Basil Sauce
  • 1 box (16 oz.) linguine, cooked and drained

10-Minute Arrabbiata Sauce Directions

  1. Heat olive oil in 2-quart saucepan over medium heat and cook garlic and red pepper flakes 30 seconds. Stir in sauce. Simmer, stirring occasionally, 8 minutes. Serve over hot linguine.
  2. Smart Choices Program™ approved recipes were developed to bring nutrition to your kitchen with delicious recipes that help you make positive changes in your diet through a variety and balance of food choices from each of the major food groups.

Recipe Categories

  • Italian
  • Sauce Recipes
  • Tomato : Lycopersicon lycopersicum (L.) H. Karst.
    Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.
    The tomato is the edible berry of the plant Solanum lycopersicum, commonly known as a tomato plant. The species originated in western South America and Central America. The Nahuatl word tomatl gave rise to the Spanish word tomate, from which the English word tomato derived. Its domestication and use as a cultivated food may have originated with the indigenous peoples of Mexico. The Aztecs used tomatoes in their cooking at the time of the Spanish conquest of the Aztec Empire, and after the Spanish encountered the tomato for the first time after their contact with the Aztecs, they brought the plant to Europe. From there, the tomato was introduced to other parts of the European-colonized world during the 16th century.
    Tomatoes are a significant source of umami flavor.
    The tomato is consumed in diverse ways, raw or cooked, in many dishes, sauces, salads, and drinks. While tomatoes are fruits—botanically classified as berries—they are commonly used as a vegetable ingredient or side dish.
    Numerous varieties of the tomato plant are widely grown in temperate climates across the world, with greenhouses allowing for the production of tomatoes throughout all seasons of the year. Tomato plants typically grow to 1–3 meters (3–10 ft) in height. They are vines that have a weak stem that sprawls and typically needs support. Indeterminate tomato plants are perennials in their native habitat, but are cultivated as annuals. (Determinate, or bush, plants are annuals that stop growing at a certain height and produce a crop all at once.) The size of the tomato varies according to the cultivar, with a range of 1–10 cm (1⁄2–4 in) in width.
  • Low Sodium
  • Vegan : Veganism is the practice of abstaining from the use of animal products, particularly in diet, and an associated philosophy that rejects the commodity status of animals. An individual who follows the diet or philosophy is known as a vegan. Distinctions may be made between several categories of veganism. Dietary vegans, also known as “strict vegetarians”, refrain from consuming meat, eggs, dairy products, and any other animal-derived substances. An ethical vegan is someone who not only follows a plant-based diet but extends the philosophy into other areas of their lives, opposes the use of animals for any purpose, and tries to avoid any cruelty and exploitation of all animals including humans.[23] Another term is “environmental veganism”, which refers to the avoidance of animal products on the premise that the industrial farming of animals is environmentally damaging and unsustainable.[24] Well-planned vegan diets are regarded as appropriate for all stages of life, including infancy and pregnancy, by the American Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, the Australian National Health and Medical Research Council,[26] the British Dietetic Association,[27] Dietitians of Canada,[28] and the New Zealand Ministry of Health.[29] The German Society for Nutrition—which is a non-profit organisation and not an official health agency—does not recommend vegan diets for children or adolescents, or during pregnancy and breastfeeding. There is inconsistent evidence for vegan diets providing a protective effect against metabolic syndrome, but some evidence suggests that a vegan diet can help with weight loss, especially in the short term.[31][32] Vegan diets tend to be higher in dietary fiber, magnesium, folic acid, vitamin C, vitamin E, iron, and phytochemicals, and lower in dietary energy, saturated fat, cholesterol, omega-3 fatty acid, vitamin D, calcium, zinc, and vitamin B12. A poorly-planned vegan diet may lead to nutritional deficiencies that nullify any beneficial effects and may cause serious health issues,[33][34][35] some of which can only be prevented with fortified foods or dietary supplements.[33][36] Vitamin B12 supplementation is important because its deficiency can cause blood disorders and potentially irreversible neurological damage; this danger is also one of the most common in poorly-planned non-vegan diets.[35][37][38] The word ‘vegan' was coined by Donald Watson and his then-future wife Dorothy Morgan in 1944.[39][40] It was derived from ‘Allvega' and ‘Allvegan' which had been used and suggested beforehand by original members and future officers of the society George A. Henderson and his wife Fay,[41] the latter of whom wrote the first vegan recipe book.[39] At first, they used it to mean “non-dairy vegetarian”,[42][43] however, by May 1945, vegans explicitly abstained from “eggs, honey; and animals' milk, butter and cheese”. From 1951, the Society defined it as “the doctrine that man should live without exploiting animals”.[44] Interest in veganism increased significantly in the 2010s,[45][46] especially in the latter half, with more vegan stores opening and more vegan options becoming increasingly available in supermarkets and restaurants worldwide.[46]

Potential cookware or bakeware items for your recipe

Below are cookware or bakeware items that might be needed for this 10-Minute Arrabbiata Sauce recipe or similar recipes. If certain kitchen tools don't apply, then simply skip to the next one.

  • Cooking pots
  • Frying pan
  • Steamers
  • Colander
  • Skillet
  • Knives
  • Cutting board
  • Grater
  • Saucepan
  • Stockpot
  • Spatula
  • Tongs
Chef Antonio

Chef Antonio

Chef Antonio has deep family roots in Italy. He spent summers living in Rome with his nona which developed his passion for cooking and expertise in preparing traditional Italian dishes. Antonio has two girls, one boy and a dog that he loves to cook for daily!

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