3 Mix-Ins to Customize Store-Bought Gelato Recipe | Kitchen Infinity Recipes

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To make the perfect 3 Mix-Ins to Customize Store-Bought Gelato we've included ingredients and directions for you to easily follow. This recipe is considered a beginner level recipe. This 3 Mix-Ins to Customize Store-Bought Gelato will produce enough food for 4 servings.

Depending on your culture or family tradition there can be multiple variations for making this 3 Mix-Ins to Customize Store-Bought Gelato recipe. Once you've read through and familiarize yourself with our recommended ingredients and directions, you can add your own twist to this recipe to make it your own! We've included a list of potential cookware or bakeware items below that might be necessary for this 3 Mix-Ins to Customize Store-Bought Gelato recipe.

3 Mix-Ins to Customize Store-Bought Gelato Ingredients

  • 1 bunch mint leaves, lightly chopped, about 1/2 cup
  • 1/4 cup sugar
  • 2 tablespoons water
  • 2 cups strawberries, stemmed and quartered
  • 1/4 cup balsamic vinegar
  • 1/4 cup superfine sugar
  • Salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • 8 ounces bittersweet chocolate, coarsely chopped
  • 1 cup heavy cream
  • 1 teaspoon instant espresso powder
  • 1/2 cup chopped toasted hazelnuts
  • 1 pint vanilla gelato, softened

3 Mix-Ins to Customize Store-Bought Gelato Directions

  1. For the mint pesto: Mix the sugar and mint in a mortar, grinding well with the pestle. Add the water and mix. Chill if not using immediately.
  2. For the strawberries balsamic sauce: Put the strawberries into a bowl and sprinkle the balsamic vinegar and sugar over them. Add a pinch each of salt and pepper. Toss gently and marinate for 2 to 3 minutes.
  3. For the chocolate espresso ganache: Put the chocolate into a medium heatproof bowl. Bring the cream and the espresso powder to a boil in a small saucepan over medium heat. Immediately pour the boiling cream over the chopped chocolate and let it sit for 1 minute. Using a spatula, slowly stir in a circular motion until all the chocolate is melted, do not stir in too much air. Add in the chopped toasted hazelnuts and allow the mixture to cool. The ganache may be covered and stored in the refrigerator for up to 2 weeks.
  4. To serve: Blend each mix-in into 1 pint softened vanilla gelato. Put back into the freezer to harden.

Recipe Categories

  • Easy Dessert Recipes
  • Dessert : Dessert (/dɪˈzɜːrt/) is a course that concludes a meal. The course consists of sweet foods, such as confections, and possibly a beverage such as dessert wine and liqueur. In some parts of the world, such as much of Central Africa and West Africa, and most parts of China, there is no tradition of a dessert course to conclude a meal.
    The term dessert can apply to many confections, such as biscuits, cakes, cookies, custards, gelatins, ice creams, pastries, pies, puddings, macaroons, sweet soups, tarts and fruit salad. Fruit is also commonly found in dessert courses because of its naturally occurring sweetness. Some cultures sweeten foods that are more commonly savory to create desserts.
  • Italian Dessert Recipes
  • Italian
  • Fruit Dessert Recipes
  • Fruit : In botany, a fruit is the seed-bearing structure in flowering plants that is formed from the ovary after flowering.
    Fruits are the means by which flowering plants (also known as angiosperms) disseminate their seeds. Edible fruits in particular have long propagated using the movements of humans and animals in a symbiotic relationship that is the means for seed dispersal for the one group and nutrition for the other; in fact, humans and many animals have become dependent on fruits as a source of food. Consequently, fruits account for a substantial fraction of the world's agricultural output, and some (such as the apple and the pomegranate) have acquired extensive cultural and symbolic meanings.
    In common language usage, “fruit” normally means the fleshy seed-associated structures (or produce) of plants that typically are sweet or sour and edible in the raw state, such as apples, bananas, grapes, lemons, oranges, and strawberries. In botanical usage, the term “fruit” also includes many structures that are not commonly called “fruits”, such as nuts, bean pods, corn kernels, tomatoes, and wheat grains.
  • European Recipes
  • Ice Cream : Ice cream is a sweetened frozen food typically eaten as a snack or dessert. It may be made from dairy milk or cream and is flavoured with a sweetener, either sugar or an alternative, and a spice, such as cocoa or vanilla, or with fruit such as strawberries or peaches. It can also be made by whisking a flavored cream base and liquid nitrogen together. Colorings are sometimes added, in addition to stabilizers. The mixture is cooled below the freezing point of water and stirred to incorporate air spaces and to prevent detectable ice crystals from forming. The result is a smooth, semi-solid foam that is solid at very low temperatures (below 2 °C or 35 °F). It becomes more malleable as its temperature increases.
    The meaning of the name “ice cream” varies from one country to another.
    In some countries, such as the United States, “ice cream” applies only to a specific variety, and most governments regulate the commercial use of the various terms according to the relative quantities of the main ingredients, notably the amount of cream. Products that do not meet the criteria to be called ice cream are sometimes labelled “frozen dairy dessert” instead. In other countries, such as Italy and Argentina, one word is used for all variants. Analogues made from dairy alternatives, such as goat's or sheep's milk, or milk substitutes (e.g., soy, cashew, coconut, almond milk or tofu), are available for those who are lactose intolerant, allergic to dairy protein, or vegan.
    Ice cream may be served in dishes, for eating with a spoon, or licked from edible cones. Ice cream may be served with other desserts, such as apple pie, or as an ingredient in ice cream floats, sundaes, milkshakes, ice cream cakes and even baked items, such as Baked Alaska.
  • Sauce Recipes
  • Gelato : Gelato (Italian pronunciation: [dʒeˈlaːto]) is a frozen dessert of Italian origin. Artisanal gelato in Italy generally contains 6-10% butterfat, which is lower than other styles of frozen dessert. Gelato typically contains 70% less air and more flavoring than other kinds of frozen desserts, giving it a density and richness that distinguishes it from other ice creams.

Potential cookware or bakeware items for your recipe

Below are cookware or bakeware items that might be needed for this 3 Mix-Ins to Customize Store-Bought Gelato recipe or similar recipes. If certain kitchen tools don't apply, then simply skip to the next one.

  • Cooking pots
  • Frying pan
  • Steamers
  • Colander
  • Skillet
  • Knives
  • Cutting board
  • Grater
  • Saucepan
  • Stockpot
  • Spatula
  • Tongs
Chef Antonio

Chef Antonio

Chef Antonio has deep family roots in Italy. He spent summers living in Rome with his nona which developed his passion for cooking and expertise in preparing traditional Italian dishes. Antonio has two girls, one boy and a dog that he loves to cook for daily!

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