5 Spice Cajun Shrimp Recipe | Kitchen Infinity Recipes

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To make the perfect 5 Spice Cajun Shrimp we've included ingredients and directions for you to easily follow. This recipe is considered a beginner level recipe. The total time to make this recipe will be 15 min. You will need a prep time of approximately 5 min and a cook time of 10 min. This 5 Spice Cajun Shrimp will produce enough food for 4 servings.

Depending on your culture or family tradition there can be multiple variations for making this 5 Spice Cajun Shrimp recipe. Once you've read through and familiarize yourself with our recommended ingredients and directions, you can add your own twist to this recipe to make it your own! We've included a list of potential cookware or bakeware items below that might be necessary for this 5 Spice Cajun Shrimp recipe.

5 Spice Cajun Shrimp Ingredients

  • 2 tablespoons paprika
  • 2 tablespoons garlic powder
  • 2 tablespoons black pepper
  • 2 tablespoons salt
  • 2 tablespoons chili powder
  • 1 pound shrimp, unpeeled
  • 2 tablespoons lemon juice

5 Spice Cajun Shrimp Directions

  1. Preheat grill.
  2. Combine equal parts of the 5 spices for the shrimp, to taste. Add the shrimp and toss to coat. Grill for 2 minutes, then sprinkle with some of the lemon juice. Flip the shrimp after 5 minutes and sprinkle other side with more lemon juice. Cook for 3 more minutes. Remove from heat, and sprinkle with the remaining lemon juice.

Recipe Categories

  • Grilled Shrimp
  • Grilling : Grilling is a form of cooking that involves dry heat applied to the surface of food, commonly from above, below or from the side. Grilling usually involves a significant amount of direct, radiant heat, and tends to be used for cooking meat and vegetables quickly. Food to be grilled is cooked on a grill (an open wire grid such as a gridiron with a heat source above or below), using a cast iron/frying pan, or a grill pan (similar to a frying pan, but with raised ridges to mimic the wires of an open grill).
    Heat transfer to the food when using a grill is primarily through thermal radiation. Heat transfer when using a grill pan or griddle is by direct conduction. In the United States, when the heat source for grilling comes from above, grilling is called broiling. In this case, the pan that holds the food is called a broiler pan, and heat transfer is through thermal radiation.
    Direct heat grilling can expose food to temperatures often in excess of 260 °C (500 °F). Grilled meat acquires a distinctive roast aroma and flavor from a chemical process called the Maillard reaction. The Maillard reaction only occurs when foods reach temperatures in excess of 155 °C (310 °F).
    Studies have shown that cooking beef, pork, poultry, and fish at high temperatures can lead to the formation of heterocyclic amines, benzopyrenes, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, which are carcinogens.
    Marination may reduce the formation of these compounds. Grilling is often presented as a healthy alternative to cooking with oils, although the fat and juices lost by grilling can contribute to drier food.
  • Shellfish Recipes
  • Shrimp : Shrimp are decapod crustaceans with elongated bodies and a primarily swimming mode of locomotion – most commonly Caridea and Dendrobranchiata. More narrow definitions may be restricted to Caridea, to smaller species of either group or to only the marine species. Under a broader definition, shrimp may be synonymous with prawn, covering stalk-eyed swimming crustaceans with long, narrow muscular tails (abdomens), long whiskers (antennae), and slender legs. Any small crustacean which resembles a shrimp tends to be called one. They swim forward by paddling with swimmerets on the underside of their abdomens, although their escape response is typically repeated flicks with the tail driving them backwards very quickly. Crabs and lobsters have strong walking legs, whereas shrimp have thin, fragile legs which they use primarily for perching.
    Shrimp are widespread and abundant. There are thousands of species adapted to a wide range of habitats. They can be found feeding near the seafloor on most coasts and estuaries, as well as in rivers and lakes. To escape predators, some species flip off the seafloor and dive into the sediment. They usually live from one to seven years. Shrimp are often solitary, though they can form large schools during the spawning season.
    They play important roles in the food chain and are an important food source for larger animals ranging from fish to whales. The muscular tails of many shrimp are edible to humans, and they are widely caught and farmed for human consumption. Commercial shrimp species support an industry worth 50 billion dollars a year, and in 2010 the total commercial production of shrimp was nearly 7 million tonnes. Shrimp farming became more prevalent during the 1980s, particularly in China, and by 2007 the harvest from shrimp farms exceeded the capture of wild shrimp. There are significant issues with excessive bycatch when shrimp are captured in the wild, and with pollution damage done to estuaries when they are used to support shrimp farming. Many shrimp species are small as the term shrimp suggests, about 2 cm (0.79 in) long, but some shrimp exceed 25 cm (9.8 in). Larger shrimp are more likely to be targeted commercially and are often referred to as prawns, particularly in Britain.
  • American : American(s) may refer to:
  • Cajun : The Cajuns (/ˈkeɪdʒənz/; Louisiana French: les Cadiens [le ka.dʒɛ̃]), also known as Acadians (Louisiana French: les Acadiens), are an ethnic group mainly living in the U.S. state of Louisiana. They also live in the Canadian maritimes provinces consisting in part of the descendants of the original Acadian exiles—French-speakers from Acadia (L'Acadie) in what are now the Maritimes of Eastern Canada. In Louisiana, Acadian and Cajun are often used as broad cultural terms without reference to actual descent from the deported Acadians. Historically, Louisianians of Acadian descent were also considered to be Louisiana Creoles, although Cajun and Creole are often portrayed as separate identities today. Most Cajuns are of French descent. The Cajuns make up a significant portion of south Louisiana's population and have had an enormous impact on the state's culture.
    While Lower Louisiana had been settled by French colonists since the late 17th century, the Cajuns trace their roots to the influx of Acadian settlers after the Great Expulsion from their homeland during the French and British hostilities prior to the Seven Years' War (1756 to 1763). The Acadia region to which modern Cajuns trace their origin consisted largely of what are now Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, Prince Edward Island plus parts of eastern Quebec and northern Maine. Since their establishment in Louisiana, the Cajuns have become famous for their unique French dialect, Louisiana French (also called “Cajun French”, although the dialect predates the Acadians' arrival in Louisiana), and have developed a vibrant culture including folkways, music, and cuisine. The Acadiana region is heavily associated with them.
  • Southern Recipes
  • Main Dish
  • Appetizer : An hors d'oeuvre (/ɔːr ˈdɜːrv(rə)/ or DURV(-rə); French: hors-d'œuvre [ɔʁ dœvʁ] (listen)), appetizer or starter is a small dish served before a meal in European cuisine. Some hors d'oeuvres are served cold, others hot. Hors d'oeuvres may be served at the dinner table as a part of the meal, or they may be served before seating, such as at a reception or cocktail party. Formerly, hors d'oeuvres were also served between courses.
    Typically smaller than a main dish, an hors d'oeuvre is often designed to be eaten by hand.
  • Lunch : Lunch is a meal eaten around midday. During the 20th century, the meaning gradually narrowed to a meal eaten midday. Lunch is commonly the second meal of the day, after breakfast. The meal varies in size depending on the culture, and significant variations exist in different areas of the world.

Potential cookware or bakeware items for your recipe

Below are cookware or bakeware items that might be needed for this 5 Spice Cajun Shrimp recipe or similar recipes. If certain kitchen tools don't apply, then simply skip to the next one.

  • Cooking pots
  • Frying pan
  • Steamers
  • Colander
  • Skillet
  • Knives
  • Cutting board
  • Grater
  • Saucepan
  • Stockpot
  • Spatula
  • Tongs
Chef Antonio

Chef Antonio

Chef Antonio has deep family roots in Italy. He spent summers living in Rome with his nona which developed his passion for cooking and expertise in preparing traditional Italian dishes. Antonio has two girls, one boy and a dog that he loves to cook for daily!

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