Acquacotta Recipe | Kitchen Infinity Recipes

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To make the perfect Acquacotta we've included ingredients and directions for you to easily follow. This recipe is considered a beginner level recipe. The total time to make this recipe will be 45 min. You will need a prep time of approximately 20 min and a cook time of 25 min. This Acquacotta will produce enough food for 4 to 6 servings.

Depending on your culture or family tradition there can be multiple variations for making this Acquacotta recipe. Once you've read through and familiarize yourself with our recommended ingredients and directions, you can add your own twist to this recipe to make it your own! We've included a list of potential cookware or bakeware items below that might be necessary for this Acquacotta recipe.

Acquacotta Ingredients

  • 1/4 cup/50 ml extra-virgin olive oil
  • 1 white onion, coarsely chopped
  • 1 pound/500 g fresh porcini mushroom, cleaned and coarsely chopped
  • 1 bunch spinach, washed, dried and chopped
  • 1 fresh chile pepper, chopped
  • 2 1/2 cups/600 ml water
  • Salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • 1/4 cup/50 ml freshly grated Parmigiano cheese, for sprinkling

Acquacotta Directions

  1. Heat up the extra-virgin olive oil in a deep saucepan. Add the onion and cook until soft. Then add the chopped mushrooms and chopped spinach and mix together. Add the chile pepper, salt, and pepper.
  2. Add the water, enough to cover the vegetables. Simmer for approximately 15 minutes.
  3. Sprinkle with Parmigiano cheese.

Recipe Categories

  • Healthy : Health, according to the World Health Organization, is “a state of complete physical, mental and social well-being and not merely the absence of disease and infirmity”. A variety of definitions have been used for different purposes over time. Health can be promoted by encouraging healthful activities, such as regular physical exercise and adequate sleep, and by reducing or avoiding unhealthful activities or situations, such as smoking or excessive stress. Some factors affecting health are due to individual choices, such as whether to engage in a high-risk behavior, while others are due to structural causes, such as whether the society is arranged in a way that makes it easier or harder for people to get necessary healthcare services. Still other factors are beyond both individual and group choices, such as genetic disorders.
  • Italian
  • Soup : Soup is a primarily liquid food, generally served warm or hot (but may be cool or cold), that is made by combining ingredients of meat or vegetables with stock, milk, or water. Hot soups are additionally characterized by boiling solid ingredients in liquids in a pot until the flavors are extracted, forming a broth. Soups are similar to stews, and in some cases there may not be a clear distinction between the two; however, soups generally have more liquid (broth) than stews.
    In traditional French cuisine, soups are classified into two main groups: clear soups and thick soups. The established French classifications of clear soups are bouillon and consommé. Thick soups are classified depending upon the type of thickening agent used: purées are vegetable soups thickened with starch; bisques are made from puréed shellfish or vegetables thickened with cream; cream soups may be thickened with béchamel sauce; and veloutés are thickened with eggs, butter, and cream. Other ingredients commonly used to thicken soups and broths include rice, lentils, flour, and grains; many popular soups also include pumpkin, carrots, potatoes, pig's trotters and bird's nests.
    Other types of soup include fruit soups, dessert soups, pulse soups like split pea, cold soups and other styles.
  • Spinach : Spinach (Spinacia oleracea) is a leafy green flowering plant native to central and western Asia. It is of the order Caryophyllales, family Amaranthaceae, subfamily Chenopodioideae. Its leaves are a common edible vegetable consumed either fresh, or after storage using preservation techniques by canning, freezing, or dehydration. It may be eaten cooked or raw, and the taste differs considerably; the high oxalate content may be reduced by steaming.
    It is an annual plant (rarely biennial), growing as tall as 30 cm (1 ft). Spinach may overwinter in temperate regions. The leaves are alternate, simple, ovate to triangular, and very variable in size: 2–30 cm (1–12 in) long and 1–15 cm (0.4–5.9 in) broad, with larger leaves at the base of the plant and small leaves higher on the flowering stem. The flowers are inconspicuous, yellow-green, 3–4 mm (0.1–0.2 in) in diameter, and mature into a small, hard, dry, lumpy fruit cluster 5–10 mm (0.2–0.4 in) across containing several seeds.
    In 2018, world production of spinach was 26.3 million tonnes, with China alone accounting for 90% of the total.
  • Mushroom : A mushroom or toadstool is the fleshy, spore-bearing fruiting body of a fungus, typically produced above ground, on soil, or on its food source.
    The standard for the name “mushroom” is the cultivated white button mushroom, Agaricus bisporus; hence the word “mushroom” is most often applied to those fungi (Basidiomycota, Agaricomycetes) that have a stem (stipe), a cap (pileus), and gills (lamellae, sing. lamella) on the underside of the cap. “Mushroom” also describes a variety of other gilled fungi, with or without stems, therefore the term is used to describe the fleshy fruiting bodies of some Ascomycota. These gills produce microscopic spores that help the fungus spread across the ground or its occupant surface.
    Forms deviating from the standard morphology usually have more specific names, such as “bolete”, “puffball”, “stinkhorn”, and “morel”, and gilled mushrooms themselves are often called “agarics” in reference to their similarity to Agaricus or their order Agaricales. By extension, the term “mushroom” can also refer to either the entire fungus when in culture, the thallus (called a mycelium) of species forming the fruiting bodies called mushrooms, or the species itself.
  • Gluten Free : A gluten-free diet (GFD) is a nutritional plan that strictly excludes gluten, which is a mixture of proteins found in wheat (and all of its species and hybrids, such as spelt, kamut, and triticale), as well as barley, rye, and oats. The inclusion of oats in a gluten-free diet remains controversial, and may depend on the oat cultivar and the frequent cross-contamination with other gluten-containing cereals.
    Gluten may cause both gastrointestinal and systemic symptoms for those with gluten-related disorders, including coeliac disease (CD), non-coeliac gluten sensitivity (NCGS), gluten ataxia, dermatitis herpetiformis (DH), and wheat allergy. In these people, the gluten-free diet is demonstrated as an effective treatment, but several studies show that about 79% of the people with coeliac disease have an incomplete recovery of the small bowel, despite a strict gluten-free diet.[10] This is mainly caused by inadvertent ingestion of gluten.[10] People with a poor understanding of a gluten-free diet often believe that they are strictly following the diet, but are making regular errors.[10][11] In addition, a gluten-free diet may, in at least some cases, improve gastrointestinal or systemic symptoms in diseases like irritable bowel syndrome, rheumatoid arthritis, or HIV enteropathy, among others.[12] There is no good evidence that gluten-free diets are an alternative medical treatment for people with autism.[13][14][15] Gluten proteins have low nutritional and biological value and the grains that contain gluten are not essential in the human diet.[16] However, an unbalanced selection of food and an incorrect choice of gluten-free replacement products may lead to nutritional deficiencies. Replacing flour from wheat or other gluten-containing cereals with gluten-free flours in commercial products may lead to a lower intake of important nutrients, such as iron and B vitamins. Some gluten-free commercial replacement products are not enriched or fortified as their gluten-containing counterparts, and often have greater lipid/carbohydrate content. Children especially often over-consume these products, such as snacks and biscuits. Nutritional complications can be prevented by a correct dietary education.
    A gluten-free diet may be based on gluten-free foods, such as meat, fish, eggs, milk and dairy products, legumes, nuts, fruits, vegetables, potatoes, rice, and corn.[17] Gluten-free processed foods may be used. Pseudocereals (quinoa, amaranth, and buckwheat) and some minor cereals are alternative choices.[16]
  • Diabetes-Friendly
  • Low Calorie
  • Low-Cholesterol

Potential cookware or bakeware items for your recipe

Below are cookware or bakeware items that might be needed for this Acquacotta recipe or similar recipes. If certain kitchen tools don't apply, then simply skip to the next one.

  • Cooking pots
  • Frying pan
  • Steamers
  • Colander
  • Skillet
  • Knives
  • Cutting board
  • Grater
  • Saucepan
  • Stockpot
  • Spatula
  • Tongs
Chef Antonio

Chef Antonio

Chef Antonio has deep family roots in Italy. He spent summers living in Rome with his nona which developed his passion for cooking and expertise in preparing traditional Italian dishes. Antonio has two girls, one boy and a dog that he loves to cook for daily!

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