Almond Butter, Oat and Cranberry Cookie Dough Balls Recipe | Kitchen Infinity Recipes

Jump to Section

To make the perfect Almond Butter, Oat and Cranberry Cookie Dough Balls we've included ingredients and directions for you to easily follow. This recipe is considered a beginner level recipe. The total time to make this recipe will be 45 min. This Almond Butter, Oat and Cranberry Cookie Dough Balls will produce enough food for 30 cookie dough balls.

Depending on your culture or family tradition there can be multiple variations for making this Almond Butter, Oat and Cranberry Cookie Dough Balls recipe. Once you've read through and familiarize yourself with our recommended ingredients and directions, you can add your own twist to this recipe to make it your own! We've included a list of potential cookware or bakeware items below that might be necessary for this Almond Butter, Oat and Cranberry Cookie Dough Balls recipe.

Almond Butter, Oat and Cranberry Cookie Dough Balls Ingredients

  • 1 cup almond flour
  • 1/2 cup unsweetened almond butter
  • 1/2 cup maple syrup
  • 1/2 cup old-fashioned oats
  • 1/3 cup dried cranberries
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 4 Medjool dates, pitted and chopped

Almond Butter, Oat and Cranberry Cookie Dough Balls Directions

  1. Add the flour, almond butter, maple syrup, oats, cranberries, vanilla and dates to a large bowl and stir to combine. Refrigerate the dough for 30 minutes.
  2. Scoop out 1 tablespoon size portions of dough and roll into a ball. Place the cookie dough ball onto a plate and continue the process with the remaining dough.
  3. Cookie dough balls can be stored in an airtight container in the fridge for up to 2 weeks.

Recipe Categories

  • Cookie : A cookie is a baked or cooked snack or dessert that is typically small, flat and sweet. It usually contains flour, sugar, egg, and some type of oil, fat, or butter. It may include other ingredients such as raisins, oats, chocolate chips, nuts, etc.
    In most English-speaking countries except for the United States, crunchy cookies are called biscuits. Many Canadians also use this term. Chewier biscuits are sometimes called cookies even in the United Kingdom. Some cookies may also be named by their shape, such as date squares or bars.
    Biscuit or cookie variants include sandwich biscuits, such as custard creams, Jammie Dodgers, Bourbons and Oreos, with marshmallow or jam filling and sometimes dipped in chocolate or another sweet coating. Cookies are often served with beverages such as milk, coffee or tea and sometimes “dunked”, an approach which releases more flavour from confections by dissolving the sugars, while also softening their texture. Factory-made cookies are sold in grocery stores, convenience stores and vending machines. Fresh-baked cookies are sold at bakeries and coffeehouses, with the latter ranging from small business-sized establishments to multinational corporations such as Starbucks.
  • Almond Recipes
  • Nut Recipes
  • Grain Recipes
  • Oats : The oat (Avena sativa), sometimes called the common oat, is a species of cereal grain grown for its seed, which is known by the same name (usually in the plural, unlike other cereals and pseudocereals). While oats are suitable for human consumption as oatmeal and rolled oats, one of the most common uses is as livestock feed.
  • Cranberry : Vaccinium erythrocarpum
    Vaccinium macrocarpon
    Vaccinium microcarpum
    Vaccinium oxycoccos
    Cranberries are a group of evergreen dwarf shrubs or trailing vines in the subgenus Oxycoccus of the genus Vaccinium. In Britain, cranberry may refer to the native species Vaccinium oxycoccos, while in North America, cranberry may refer to Vaccinium macrocarpon. Vaccinium oxycoccos is cultivated in central and northern Europe, while Vaccinium macrocarpon is cultivated throughout the northern United States, Canada and Chile. In some methods of classification, Oxycoccus is regarded as a genus in its own right. They can be found in acidic bogs throughout the cooler regions of the Northern Hemisphere.
    Cranberries are low, creeping shrubs or vines up to 2 meters (7 ft) long and 5 to 20 centimeters (2 to 8 in) in height; they have slender, wiry stems that are not thickly woody and have small evergreen leaves. The flowers are dark pink, with very distinct reflexed petals, leaving the style and stamens fully exposed and pointing forward. They are pollinated by bees. The fruit is a berry that is larger than the leaves of the plant; it is initially light green, turning red when ripe. It is edible, but with an acidic taste that usually overwhelms its sweetness.
    In 2017, the United States, Canada, and Chile accounted for 98% of the world production of cranberries. Most cranberries are processed into products such as juice, sauce, jam, and sweetened dried cranberries, with the remainder sold fresh to consumers. Cranberry sauce is a traditional accompaniment to turkey at Christmas and Thanksgiving dinners in the United States and Canada, and at Christmas dinner in the United Kingdom.
  • Fruit : In botany, a fruit is the seed-bearing structure in flowering plants that is formed from the ovary after flowering.
    Fruits are the means by which flowering plants (also known as angiosperms) disseminate their seeds. Edible fruits in particular have long propagated using the movements of humans and animals in a symbiotic relationship that is the means for seed dispersal for the one group and nutrition for the other; in fact, humans and many animals have become dependent on fruits as a source of food. Consequently, fruits account for a substantial fraction of the world's agricultural output, and some (such as the apple and the pomegranate) have acquired extensive cultural and symbolic meanings.
    In common language usage, “fruit” normally means the fleshy seed-associated structures (or produce) of plants that typically are sweet or sour and edible in the raw state, such as apples, bananas, grapes, lemons, oranges, and strawberries. In botanical usage, the term “fruit” also includes many structures that are not commonly called “fruits”, such as nuts, bean pods, corn kernels, tomatoes, and wheat grains.
  • Dessert : Dessert (/dɪˈzɜːrt/) is a course that concludes a meal. The course consists of sweet foods, such as confections, and possibly a beverage such as dessert wine and liqueur. In some parts of the world, such as much of Central Africa and West Africa, and most parts of China, there is no tradition of a dessert course to conclude a meal.
    The term dessert can apply to many confections, such as biscuits, cakes, cookies, custards, gelatins, ice creams, pastries, pies, puddings, macaroons, sweet soups, tarts and fruit salad. Fruit is also commonly found in dessert courses because of its naturally occurring sweetness. Some cultures sweeten foods that are more commonly savory to create desserts.
  • Low Sodium

Potential cookware or bakeware items for your recipe

Below are cookware or bakeware items that might be needed for this Almond Butter, Oat and Cranberry Cookie Dough Balls recipe or similar recipes. If certain kitchen tools don't apply, then simply skip to the next one.

  • Baking pan
  • Cookie sheet
  • 9×13 pan
  • Muffin pan
  • Round cake pan
  • Loaf pan
  • Tart Pan
  • Pie plate
  • Bundt pan
  • Donut pan
  • Measuring cups
  • Measuring spoons
  • Whisk
  • Oven mitts
Chef Antonio

Chef Antonio

Chef Antonio has deep family roots in Italy. He spent summers living in Rome with his nona which developed his passion for cooking and expertise in preparing traditional Italian dishes. Antonio has two girls, one boy and a dog that he loves to cook for daily!

Related Articles

Download Free Chart Now!

Your email will be used only to confirm your request and to provide free kitchen information. By submitting your info on this form, you are agreeing to be contacted regarding your service request by means of email. This is no obligation form and doesn’t require you to purchase any service.

norton_black
comodo_black