Almond Spice Bars Recipe | Kitchen Infinity Recipes

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To make the perfect Almond Spice Bars we've included ingredients and directions for you to easily follow. This recipe is considered a beginner level recipe. The total time to make this recipe will be 2 hr 45 min. This Almond Spice Bars will produce enough food for about 24.

Depending on your culture or family tradition there can be multiple variations for making this Almond Spice Bars recipe. Once you've read through and familiarize yourself with our recommended ingredients and directions, you can add your own twist to this recipe to make it your own! We've included a list of potential cookware or bakeware items below that might be necessary for this Almond Spice Bars recipe.

Almond Spice Bars Ingredients

  • Cooking spray
  • 1/2 cup honey
  • 1/2 cup granulated sugar
  • 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground cloves
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground nutmeg
  • 1 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1 large egg, lightly beaten
  • 1 1/2 cups sliced almonds
  • 1/4 cup finely chopped candied orange peel, plus more for topping
  • 1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
  • Finely grated zest of 1 lemon
  • 2 tablespoons orange liqueur
  • 1/2 cup confectioners' sugar
  • 1 tablespoon fresh orange juice

Almond Spice Bars Directions

  1. Line an 8-inch square baking dish with parchment paper, leaving a 2-inch overhang; coat with cooking spray. Bring the honey and granulated sugar to a simmer in a small saucepan over medium heat, stirring to dissolve. Remove from the heat and transfer to a large bowl. Stir in the cinnamon, cloves and nutmeg; let cool slightly, 10 minutes.
  2. Whisk the flour, baking powder and salt in a medium bowl. Quickly stir the beaten egg into the honey-sugar mixture with a rubber spatula, then add the almonds, orange peel, vanilla, lemon zest and 1 tablespoon liqueur. Stir in the flour mixture until combined (the dough will be stiff and dry). Scrape into the prepared pan. Lightly coat a piece of plastic wrap with cooking spray and use to press the dough into an even layer. Set aside 1 hour.
  3. Preheat the oven to 375 degrees F. Bake the bars until golden brown and a toothpick inserted into the center comes out with only a few crumbs, 25 to 30 minutes.
  4. Make the glaze: Whisk the confectioners' sugar, orange juice and remaining 1 tablespoon
  5. liqueur in a bowl until smooth. Brush the warm bars with some of the glaze; cover the remaining glaze and set aside. Let the bars cool 10 minutes in the pan, then remove to a cutting board. Cut into 1-by-2 1/2-inch bars and let cool completely on a rack.
  6. Drizzle the bars with the remaining glaze; top with candied orange peel.

Recipe Categories

  • Cookie : A cookie is a baked or cooked snack or dessert that is typically small, flat and sweet. It usually contains flour, sugar, egg, and some type of oil, fat, or butter. It may include other ingredients such as raisins, oats, chocolate chips, nuts, etc.
    In most English-speaking countries except for the United States, crunchy cookies are called biscuits. Many Canadians also use this term. Chewier biscuits are sometimes called cookies even in the United Kingdom. Some cookies may also be named by their shape, such as date squares or bars.
    Biscuit or cookie variants include sandwich biscuits, such as custard creams, Jammie Dodgers, Bourbons and Oreos, with marshmallow or jam filling and sometimes dipped in chocolate or another sweet coating. Cookies are often served with beverages such as milk, coffee or tea and sometimes “dunked”, an approach which releases more flavour from confections by dissolving the sugars, while also softening their texture. Factory-made cookies are sold in grocery stores, convenience stores and vending machines. Fresh-baked cookies are sold at bakeries and coffeehouses, with the latter ranging from small business-sized establishments to multinational corporations such as Starbucks.
  • Sugar : Sugar is the generic name for sweet-tasting, soluble carbohydrates, many of which are used in food. Simple sugars, also called monosaccharides, include glucose, fructose, and galactose. Compound sugars, also called disaccharides or double sugars, are molecules made of two monosaccharides joined by a glycosidic bond. Common examples are sucrose (glucose + fructose), lactose (glucose + galactose), and maltose (two molecules of glucose). Table sugar, granulated sugar, and regular sugar refer to sucrose, a disaccharide composed of glucose and fructose. In the body, compound sugars are hydrolysed into simple sugars.
    Longer chains of monosaccharides (>2) are not regarded as sugars, and are called oligosaccharides or polysaccharides. Starch is a glucose polymer found in plants, and is the most abundant source of energy in human food. Some other chemical substances, such as glycerol and sugar alcohols, may have a sweet taste, but are not classified as sugar.
    Sugars are found in the tissues of most plants. Honey and fruit are abundant natural sources of simple sugars. Sucrose is especially concentrated in sugarcane and sugar beet, making them ideal for efficient commercial extraction to make refined sugar. In 2016, the combined world production of those two crops was about two billion tonnes. Maltose may be produced by malting grain. Lactose is the only sugar that cannot be extracted from plants. It can only be found in milk, including human breast milk, and in some dairy products. A cheap source of sugar is corn syrup, industrially produced by converting corn starch into sugars, such as maltose, fructose and glucose.
    Sucrose is used in prepared foods (e.g. cookies and cakes), is sometimes added to commercially available processed food and beverages, and may be used by people as a sweetener for foods (e.g. toast and cereal) and beverages (e.g. coffee and tea). The average person consumes about 24 kilograms (53 lb) of sugar each year, with North and South Americans consuming up to 50 kilograms (110 lb) and Africans consuming under 20 kilograms (44 lb).
    As sugar consumption grew in the latter part of the 20th century, researchers began to examine whether a diet high in sugar, especially refined sugar, was damaging to human health. Excessive consumption of sugar has been implicated in the onset of obesity, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and tooth decay. Numerous studies have tried to clarify those implications, but with varying results, mainly because of the difficulty of finding populations for use as controls that consume little or no sugar. In 2015, the World Health Organization recommended that adults and children reduce their intake of free sugars to less than 10%, and encouraged a reduction to below 5%, of their total energy intake.
  • Almond Recipes
  • Nut Recipes
  • Low Sodium

Potential cookware or bakeware items for your recipe

Below are cookware or bakeware items that might be needed for this Almond Spice Bars recipe or similar recipes. If certain kitchen tools don't apply, then simply skip to the next one.

  • Baking pan
  • Cookie sheet
  • 9×13 pan
  • Muffin pan
  • Round cake pan
  • Loaf pan
  • Tart Pan
  • Pie plate
  • Bundt pan
  • Donut pan
  • Measuring cups
  • Measuring spoons
  • Whisk
  • Oven mitts
Chef Antonio

Chef Antonio

Chef Antonio has deep family roots in Italy. He spent summers living in Rome with his nona which developed his passion for cooking and expertise in preparing traditional Italian dishes. Antonio has two girls, one boy and a dog that he loves to cook for daily!

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