Almond Tart with Raspberries Recipe | Kitchen Infinity Recipes

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To make the perfect Almond Tart with Raspberries we've included ingredients and directions for you to easily follow. This recipe is considered a beginner level recipe. The total time to make this recipe will be 35 min. You will need a prep time of approximately 15 min and a cook time of 15 min. This Almond Tart with Raspberries will produce enough food for 12 servings.

Depending on your culture or family tradition there can be multiple variations for making this Almond Tart with Raspberries recipe. Once you've read through and familiarize yourself with our recommended ingredients and directions, you can add your own twist to this recipe to make it your own! We've included a list of potential cookware or bakeware items below that might be necessary for this Almond Tart with Raspberries recipe.

Almond Tart with Raspberries Ingredients

  • 4 ounces/1 stick (110 grams) butter
  • 4 ounces/generous 1/2 cup (110 grams) castor sugar
  • 4 ounces/generous 1 cup (110 grams) ground almonds
  • Fresh raspberries
  • Red Currant Glaze, recipe follows
  • 1/2 pint (300 milliliters/1 1/4 cups) whipped Jersey cream
  • 12 ounces (350 grams) red currant jelly
  • 1 tablespoon plus 1 teaspoon water

Almond Tart with Raspberries Directions

  1. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F /180 degrees C.
  2. Cream the butter well and then just stir in the sugar and ground almonds. (Don't over beat or the oil will come out of the ground almonds as it cooks.) Put a teaspoon of the mixture into 24 small patty tins, or divide between 2 by 7-inch sandwich tins. Bake until golden brown 10 to 30 minutes depending on the pans used.
  3. The tarts or tartlets are too soft to turn out immediately, so cool in the tins for about 5 minutes before turning out. Do not allow to set hard before removing to a wire rack or the butter will solidify and they will stick to the tins. If this happens pop the tins back into the oven for a few minutes so the butter melts and then they will come out easily.
  4. Just before serving, arrange whole raspberries on the base. Glaze with Red Currant Glaze and decorate with rosettes of Jersey cream.
  5. Melt the red currant jelly with the water in a small stainless steel saucepan. Stir gently, but do not whisk, or it will become cloudy. Cook it just for 1 to 2 minutes longer for the jelly to darken. Store any leftover glaze in an airtight jar and reheat gently to melt it before use.

Recipe Categories

  • Easy Baking
  • Pastry Recipes
  • Sugar : Sugar is the generic name for sweet-tasting, soluble carbohydrates, many of which are used in food. Simple sugars, also called monosaccharides, include glucose, fructose, and galactose. Compound sugars, also called disaccharides or double sugars, are molecules made of two monosaccharides joined by a glycosidic bond. Common examples are sucrose (glucose + fructose), lactose (glucose + galactose), and maltose (two molecules of glucose). Table sugar, granulated sugar, and regular sugar refer to sucrose, a disaccharide composed of glucose and fructose. In the body, compound sugars are hydrolysed into simple sugars.
    Longer chains of monosaccharides (>2) are not regarded as sugars, and are called oligosaccharides or polysaccharides. Starch is a glucose polymer found in plants, and is the most abundant source of energy in human food. Some other chemical substances, such as glycerol and sugar alcohols, may have a sweet taste, but are not classified as sugar.
    Sugars are found in the tissues of most plants. Honey and fruit are abundant natural sources of simple sugars. Sucrose is especially concentrated in sugarcane and sugar beet, making them ideal for efficient commercial extraction to make refined sugar. In 2016, the combined world production of those two crops was about two billion tonnes. Maltose may be produced by malting grain. Lactose is the only sugar that cannot be extracted from plants. It can only be found in milk, including human breast milk, and in some dairy products. A cheap source of sugar is corn syrup, industrially produced by converting corn starch into sugars, such as maltose, fructose and glucose.
    Sucrose is used in prepared foods (e.g. cookies and cakes), is sometimes added to commercially available processed food and beverages, and may be used by people as a sweetener for foods (e.g. toast and cereal) and beverages (e.g. coffee and tea). The average person consumes about 24 kilograms (53 lb) of sugar each year, with North and South Americans consuming up to 50 kilograms (110 lb) and Africans consuming under 20 kilograms (44 lb).
    As sugar consumption grew in the latter part of the 20th century, researchers began to examine whether a diet high in sugar, especially refined sugar, was damaging to human health. Excessive consumption of sugar has been implicated in the onset of obesity, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and tooth decay. Numerous studies have tried to clarify those implications, but with varying results, mainly because of the difficulty of finding populations for use as controls that consume little or no sugar. In 2015, the World Health Organization recommended that adults and children reduce their intake of free sugars to less than 10%, and encouraged a reduction to below 5%, of their total energy intake.
  • Fruit : In botany, a fruit is the seed-bearing structure in flowering plants that is formed from the ovary after flowering.
    Fruits are the means by which flowering plants (also known as angiosperms) disseminate their seeds. Edible fruits in particular have long propagated using the movements of humans and animals in a symbiotic relationship that is the means for seed dispersal for the one group and nutrition for the other; in fact, humans and many animals have become dependent on fruits as a source of food. Consequently, fruits account for a substantial fraction of the world's agricultural output, and some (such as the apple and the pomegranate) have acquired extensive cultural and symbolic meanings.
    In common language usage, “fruit” normally means the fleshy seed-associated structures (or produce) of plants that typically are sweet or sour and edible in the raw state, such as apples, bananas, grapes, lemons, oranges, and strawberries. In botanical usage, the term “fruit” also includes many structures that are not commonly called “fruits”, such as nuts, bean pods, corn kernels, tomatoes, and wheat grains.
  • Raspberry Recipes
  • Nut Recipes
  • Gluten Free : A gluten-free diet (GFD) is a nutritional plan that strictly excludes gluten, which is a mixture of proteins found in wheat (and all of its species and hybrids, such as spelt, kamut, and triticale), as well as barley, rye, and oats. The inclusion of oats in a gluten-free diet remains controversial, and may depend on the oat cultivar and the frequent cross-contamination with other gluten-containing cereals.
    Gluten may cause both gastrointestinal and systemic symptoms for those with gluten-related disorders, including coeliac disease (CD), non-coeliac gluten sensitivity (NCGS), gluten ataxia, dermatitis herpetiformis (DH), and wheat allergy. In these people, the gluten-free diet is demonstrated as an effective treatment, but several studies show that about 79% of the people with coeliac disease have an incomplete recovery of the small bowel, despite a strict gluten-free diet.[10] This is mainly caused by inadvertent ingestion of gluten.[10] People with a poor understanding of a gluten-free diet often believe that they are strictly following the diet, but are making regular errors.[10][11] In addition, a gluten-free diet may, in at least some cases, improve gastrointestinal or systemic symptoms in diseases like irritable bowel syndrome, rheumatoid arthritis, or HIV enteropathy, among others.[12] There is no good evidence that gluten-free diets are an alternative medical treatment for people with autism.[13][14][15] Gluten proteins have low nutritional and biological value and the grains that contain gluten are not essential in the human diet.[16] However, an unbalanced selection of food and an incorrect choice of gluten-free replacement products may lead to nutritional deficiencies. Replacing flour from wheat or other gluten-containing cereals with gluten-free flours in commercial products may lead to a lower intake of important nutrients, such as iron and B vitamins. Some gluten-free commercial replacement products are not enriched or fortified as their gluten-containing counterparts, and often have greater lipid/carbohydrate content. Children especially often over-consume these products, such as snacks and biscuits. Nutritional complications can be prevented by a correct dietary education.
    A gluten-free diet may be based on gluten-free foods, such as meat, fish, eggs, milk and dairy products, legumes, nuts, fruits, vegetables, potatoes, rice, and corn.[17] Gluten-free processed foods may be used. Pseudocereals (quinoa, amaranth, and buckwheat) and some minor cereals are alternative choices.[16]

Potential cookware or bakeware items for your recipe

Below are cookware or bakeware items that might be needed for this Almond Tart with Raspberries recipe or similar recipes. If certain kitchen tools don't apply, then simply skip to the next one.

  • Baking pan
  • Cookie sheet
  • 9×13 pan
  • Muffin pan
  • Round cake pan
  • Loaf pan
  • Tart Pan
  • Pie plate
  • Bundt pan
  • Donut pan
  • Measuring cups
  • Measuring spoons
  • Whisk
  • Oven mitts
Chef Antonio

Chef Antonio

Chef Antonio has deep family roots in Italy. He spent summers living in Rome with his nona which developed his passion for cooking and expertise in preparing traditional Italian dishes. Antonio has two girls, one boy and a dog that he loves to cook for daily!

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