Angel Hair Pasta with Caviar and Lemon Recipe | Kitchen Infinity Recipes

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To make the perfect Angel Hair Pasta with Caviar and Lemon we've included ingredients and directions for you to easily follow. This recipe is considered a beginner level recipe. The total time to make this recipe will be 30 min. This Angel Hair Pasta with Caviar and Lemon will produce enough food for 4 servings (as an appetizer).

Depending on your culture or family tradition there can be multiple variations for making this Angel Hair Pasta with Caviar and Lemon recipe. Once you've read through and familiarize yourself with our recommended ingredients and directions, you can add your own twist to this recipe to make it your own! We've included a list of potential cookware or bakeware items below that might be necessary for this Angel Hair Pasta with Caviar and Lemon recipe.

Angel Hair Pasta with Caviar and Lemon Ingredients

  • 1 cup heavy cream
  • 1 cup sour cream
  • Kosher salt and black pepper
  • Grated zest and juice of 1/2 to 1 lemon
  • 4 ounces angel hair pasta
  • 1 1/2 to 2 ounces American caviar or trout roe
  • 1 small bunch chives, minced

Angel Hair Pasta with Caviar and Lemon Directions

  1. Make the sauce: Whisk the heavy cream and sour cream in a large skillet and season with salt and pepper. Simmer over medium heat, whisking, until the mixture thickens and all the sour cream melts, 2 to 3 minutes. Add a few grates of lemon zest and some of the lemon juice. Taste for seasoning. At this point the sauce should be thick enough to coat the pasta.
  2. Meanwhile, cook the pasta: Bring a large pot of water to a boil. Add 2 tablespoons salt and bring the water back up to a boil. Add the pasta to the pot and cook until al dente, stirring occasionally to make sure it doesn't clump or stick to the bottom, about 2 minutes. Drain the pasta in a colander, reserving 1/2 cup of the cooking water.
  3. Add the pasta to the skillet and toss to coat with the cream sauce. Shut off the heat and allow the pasta to rest in the sauce for 2 minutes, tossing to coat from time to time. If the sauce is too thin, simmer over low heat for 2 additional minutes. If it is too thick, simply thin it out with some of the reserved pasta water. Taste for seasoning. Add more salt or lemon juice, if needed.
  4. Spoon a small amount of caviar onto 4 serving plates. Use a fork to twirl the pasta and make a large forkful. Use your index finger to gently coax the pasta off the fork and on top of the caviar on the plate. Repeat with the remaining plates. Spoon any leftover sauce over the pasta. Note: The sauce thickens quickly, so keep it loose with a little pasta water, if needed, as you plate. Sprinkle with the chives and a touch more grated lemon zest.

Recipe Categories

  • Pasta Recipes
  • Christmas : Christmas is an annual festival commemorating the birth of Jesus Christ, observed primarily on December 25 as a religious and cultural celebration among billions of people around the world.[10][11] A feast central to the Christian liturgical year, it is preceded by the season of Advent or the Nativity Fast and initiates the season of Christmastide, which historically in the West lasts twelve days and culminates on Twelfth Night.[12] Christmas Day is a public holiday in many countries,[13][14][15] is celebrated religiously by a majority of Christians,[16] as well as culturally by many non-Christians,[17] and forms an integral part of the holiday season organized around it.
    The traditional Christmas narrative, the Nativity of Jesus, delineated in the New Testament says that Jesus was born in Bethlehem, in accordance with messianic prophecies.[18] When Joseph and Mary arrived in the city, the inn had no room and so they were offered a stable where the Christ Child was soon born, with angels proclaiming this news to shepherds who then spread the word.[19] Although the month and date of Jesus' birth are unknown, the church in the early fourth century fixed the date as December 25.[20][21][22] This corresponds to the date of the winter solstice on the Roman calendar.[23] It is exactly nine months after Annunciation on March 25, also the date of the spring equinox. Most Christians celebrate on December 25 in the Gregorian calendar, which has been adopted almost universally in the civil calendars used in countries throughout the world. However, part of the Eastern Christian Churches celebrate Christmas on December 25 of the older Julian calendar, which currently corresponds to January 7 in the Gregorian calendar. For Christians, believing that God came into the world in the form of man to atone for the sins of humanity, rather than knowing Jesus' exact birth date, is considered to be the primary purpose in celebrating Christmas.[24][25][26] The celebratory customs associated in various countries with Christmas have a mix of pre-Christian, Christian, and secular themes and origins.[27] Popular modern customs of the holiday include gift giving; completing an Advent calendar or Advent wreath; Christmas music and caroling; viewing a Nativity play; an exchange of Christmas cards; church services; a special meal; and the display of various Christmas decorations, including Christmas trees, Christmas lights, nativity scenes, garlands, wreaths, mistletoe, and holly. In addition, several closely related and often interchangeable figures, known as Santa Claus, Father Christmas, Saint Nicholas, and Christkind, are associated with bringing gifts to children during the Christmas season and have their own body of traditions and lore.[28] Because gift-giving and many other aspects of the Christmas festival involve heightened economic activity, the holiday has become a significant event and a key sales period for retailers and businesses. Over the past few centuries, Christmas has had a steadily growing economic effect in many regions of the world.
  • Caviar : Caviar (also known as caviare; from Persian: خاویار‎, romanized: khâvyâr, lit. 'egg-bearing') is a food consisting of salt-cured roe of the family Acipenseridae. Caviar is considered a delicacy and is eaten as a garnish or a spread. Traditionally, the term caviar refers only to roe from wild sturgeon in the Caspian Sea and Black Sea (Beluga, Ossetra and Sevruga caviars). Depending on the country, caviar may also be used to describe the roe of other species of sturgeon or other fish such as salmon, steelhead, trout, lumpfish, whitefish, or carp.
    The roe can be “fresh” (non-pasteurized) or pasteurized, with pasteurization reducing its culinary and economic value.
  • Fish : Fish are aquatic, craniate, gill-bearing animals that lack limbs with digits. Included in this definition are the living hagfish, lampreys, and cartilaginous and bony fish as well as various extinct related groups. Around 99% of living fish species are ray-finned fish, belonging to the class Actinopterygii, with over 95% belonging to the teleost subgrouping.
    The earliest organisms that can be classified as fish were soft-bodied chordates that first appeared during the Cambrian period. Although they lacked a true spine, they possessed notochords which allowed them to be more agile than their invertebrate counterparts. Fish would continue to evolve through the Paleozoic era, diversifying into a wide variety of forms. Many fish of the Paleozoic developed external armor that protected them from predators. The first fish with jaws appeared in the Silurian period, after which many (such as sharks) became formidable marine predators rather than just the prey of arthropods.
    Most fish are ectothermic (“cold-blooded”), allowing their body temperatures to vary as ambient temperatures change, though some of the large active swimmers like white shark and tuna can hold a higher core temperature. Fish can acoustically communicate with each other, most often in the context of feeding, aggression or courtship.
    Fish are abundant in most bodies of water. They can be found in nearly all aquatic environments, from high mountain streams (e.g., char and gudgeon) to the abyssal and even hadal depths of the deepest oceans (e.g., cusk-eels and snailfish), although no species has yet been documented in the deepest 25% of the ocean. With 34,300 described species, fish exhibit greater species diversity than any other group of vertebrates.
    Fish are an important resource for humans worldwide, especially as food. Commercial and subsistence fishers hunt fish in wild fisheries or farm them in ponds or in cages in the ocean (in aquaculture). They are also caught by recreational fishers, kept as pets, raised by fishkeepers, and exhibited in public aquaria. Fish have had a role in culture through the ages, serving as deities, religious symbols, and as the subjects of art, books and movies.
    Tetrapods emerged within lobe-finned fishes, so cladistically they are fish as well. However, traditionally fish are rendered paraphyletic by excluding the tetrapods (i.e., the amphibians, reptiles, birds and mammals which all descended from within the same ancestry). Because in this manner the term “fish” is defined negatively as a paraphyletic group, it is not considered a formal taxonomic grouping in systematic biology, unless it is used in the cladistic sense, including tetrapods. The traditional term pisces (also ichthyes) is considered a typological, but not a phylogenetic classification.
  • Fruit : In botany, a fruit is the seed-bearing structure in flowering plants that is formed from the ovary after flowering.
    Fruits are the means by which flowering plants (also known as angiosperms) disseminate their seeds. Edible fruits in particular have long propagated using the movements of humans and animals in a symbiotic relationship that is the means for seed dispersal for the one group and nutrition for the other; in fact, humans and many animals have become dependent on fruits as a source of food. Consequently, fruits account for a substantial fraction of the world's agricultural output, and some (such as the apple and the pomegranate) have acquired extensive cultural and symbolic meanings.
    In common language usage, “fruit” normally means the fleshy seed-associated structures (or produce) of plants that typically are sweet or sour and edible in the raw state, such as apples, bananas, grapes, lemons, oranges, and strawberries. In botanical usage, the term “fruit” also includes many structures that are not commonly called “fruits”, such as nuts, bean pods, corn kernels, tomatoes, and wheat grains.
  • Lemon : The lemon (Citrus limon) is a species of small evergreen tree in the flowering plant family Rutaceae, native to Asia, primarily Northeast India (Assam), Northern Myanmar or China.
    The tree's ellipsoidal yellow fruit is used for culinary and non-culinary purposes throughout the world, primarily for its juice, which has both culinary and cleaning uses. The pulp and rind are also used in cooking and baking. The juice of the lemon is about 5% to 6% citric acid, with a pH of around 2.2, giving it a sour taste. The distinctive sour taste of lemon juice makes it a key ingredient in drinks and foods such as lemonade and lemon meringue pie.
  • Main Dish

Potential cookware or bakeware items for your recipe

Below are cookware or bakeware items that might be needed for this Angel Hair Pasta with Caviar and Lemon recipe or similar recipes. If certain kitchen tools don't apply, then simply skip to the next one.

  • Cooking pots
  • Frying pan
  • Steamers
  • Colander
  • Skillet
  • Knives
  • Cutting board
  • Grater
  • Saucepan
  • Stockpot
  • Spatula
  • Tongs
Chef Antonio

Chef Antonio

Chef Antonio has deep family roots in Italy. He spent summers living in Rome with his nona which developed his passion for cooking and expertise in preparing traditional Italian dishes. Antonio has two girls, one boy and a dog that he loves to cook for daily!

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