Angel Hair Pasta with Lemon, Fingerling Potatoes and Sunflower Greens Recipe | Kitchen Infinity Recipes

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To make the perfect Angel Hair Pasta with Lemon, Fingerling Potatoes and Sunflower Greens we've included ingredients and directions for you to easily follow. This recipe is considered a beginner level recipe. The total time to make this recipe will be 1 hr 5 min. You will need a prep time of approximately 25 min and a cook time of 40 min. This Angel Hair Pasta with Lemon, Fingerling Potatoes and Sunflower Greens will produce enough food for 4 appetizer portions.

Depending on your culture or family tradition there can be multiple variations for making this Angel Hair Pasta with Lemon, Fingerling Potatoes and Sunflower Greens recipe. Once you've read through and familiarize yourself with our recommended ingredients and directions, you can add your own twist to this recipe to make it your own! We've included a list of potential cookware or bakeware items below that might be necessary for this Angel Hair Pasta with Lemon, Fingerling Potatoes and Sunflower Greens recipe.

Angel Hair Pasta with Lemon, Fingerling Potatoes and Sunflower Greens Ingredients

  • 4 to 6 smallish fingerling potatoes (about 4 to 6 ounces total), thoroughly washed and dried
  • 1 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
  • 2 tablespoons kosher salt, for the pasta water, plus more for seasoning
  • Freshly ground black pepper
  • 6 quarts water
  • 1/2 pound dried angel hair pasta
  • 1 cup heavy cream
  • 1 cup sour cream
  • Zest of 2 lemons
  • Juice of 1 lemon
  • Worcestershire sauce
  • 1 small bunch chives, trimmed and minced
  • 1/2 cup sunflower greens
  • 4 to 6 smallish fingerling potatoes (about 4 to 6 ounces total), thoroughly washed and dried
  • 1 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
  • 2 tablespoons kosher salt, for the pasta water, plus more for seasoning
  • Freshly ground black pepper
  • 6 quarts water
  • 1/2 pound dried angel hair pasta
  • 1 cup heavy cream
  • 1 cup sour cream
  • Zest of 2 lemons
  • Juice of 1 lemon
  • Worcestershire sauce
  • 1 small bunch chives, trimmed and minced
  • 1/2 cup sunflower greens

Angel Hair Pasta with Lemon, Fingerling Potatoes and Sunflower Greens Directions

  1. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F.
  2. Cook the potatoes: Put the potatoes on a small baking sheet. Drizzle with the olive oil and season with salt and pepper, to taste. Put the tray in the center of the oven and cook until the potatoes are tender when pierced with the tip of a knife, about 20 to 30 minutes. Set aside.
  3. Cook the pasta: Bring a large pot of water to a rolling boil over medium heat. Add the 2 tablespoons salt and bring the water back up to a boil. Add the pasta and cook for 3 minutes. Stir the pasta with a slotted spoon to make sure it does not clump or stick to the bottom as it cooks.
  4. In a large colander, drain the pasta. Reserve 1/2 a cup of the pasta liquid, in case it becomes necessary to use it later on.
  5. In a large skillet, combine the heavy cream and sour cream. Season with salt and pepper, to taste. Reduce the cream over medium heat whisking until it thickens and all of the sour cream melts, 3 to 5 minutes. Add the lemon zest, lemon juice and a “splash” of Worcestershire sauce. Taste for seasoning. (*See Cook's Note) Stir in the chives.
  6. Add the pasta to the skillet and toss to coat with the cream. Shut the heat off and allow the pasta to “rest” for 2 minutes, tossing to coat, from time to time. Meanwhile, put the potatoes on a flat surface and use a sharp knife to slice them into 1/2 to 3/4-inch-thick rounds. Stir the potato slices into the pasta sauce.
  7. Serve the pasta: Warm the serving bowls. If the cream is overly thick, add a little more of the pasta cooking liquid and swirl it around over the heat for a minute. Stir in the sunflower greens and spoon the pasta into the bowls. Serve immediately.
  8. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F.
  9. Cook the potatoes: Put the potatoes on a small baking sheet. Drizzle with the olive oil and season with salt and pepper, to taste. Put the tray in the center of the oven and cook until the potatoes are tender when pierced with the tip of a knife, about 20 to 30 minutes. Set aside.
  10. Cook the pasta: Bring a large pot of water to a rolling boil over medium heat. Add the 2 tablespoons salt and bring the water back up to a boil. Add the pasta and cook for 3 minutes. Stir the pasta with a slotted spoon to make sure it does not clump or stick to the bottom as it cooks.
  11. In a large colander, drain the pasta. Reserve 1/2 a cup of the pasta liquid, in case it becomes necessary to use it later on.
  12. In a large skillet, combine the heavy cream and sour cream. Season with salt and pepper, to taste. Reduce the cream over medium heat whisking until it thickens and all of the sour cream melts, 3 to 5 minutes. Add the lemon zest, lemon juice and a “splash” of Worcestershire sauce. Taste for seasoning. (*See Cook's Note) Stir in the chives.
  13. Add the pasta to the skillet and toss to coat with the cream. Shut the heat off and allow the pasta to “rest” for 2 minutes, tossing to coat, from time to time. Meanwhile, put the potatoes on a flat surface and use a sharp knife to slice them into 1/2 to 3/4-inch-thick rounds. Stir the potato slices into the pasta sauce.
  14. Serve the pasta: Warm the serving bowls. If the cream is overly thick, add a little more of the pasta cooking liquid and swirl it around over the heat for a minute. Stir in the sunflower greens and spoon the pasta into the bowls. Serve immediately.

Recipe Categories

  • Pasta Recipes
  • Potato : The potato is a starchy tuber of the plant Solanum tuberosum and is a root vegetable native to the Americas, with the plant itself being a perennial in the nightshade family Solanaceae.
    Wild potato species, originating in modern-day Peru, can be found throughout the Americas, from Canada to southern Chile. The potato was originally believed to have been domesticated by Native Americans independently in multiple locations, but later genetic testing of the wide variety of cultivars and wild species traced a single origin for potatoes, in the area of present-day southern Peru and extreme northwestern Bolivia. Potatoes were domesticated approximately 7,000–10,000 years ago there, from a species in the Solanum brevicaule complex. In the Andes region of South America, where the species is indigenous, some close relatives of the potato are cultivated.
    Potatoes were introduced to Europe from the Americas in the second half of the 16th century by the Spanish. Today they are a staple food in many parts of the world and an integral part of much of the world's food supply. As of 2014, potatoes were the world's fourth-largest food crop after maize (corn), wheat, and rice. Following millennia of selective breeding, there are now over 5,000 different types of potatoes. Over 99% of presently cultivated potatoes worldwide descended from varieties that originated in the lowlands of south-central Chile. The importance of the potato as a food source and culinary ingredient varies by region and is still changing. It remains an essential crop in Europe, especially Northern and Eastern Europe, where per capita production is still the highest in the world, while the most rapid expansion in production over the past few decades has occurred in southern and eastern Asia, with China and India leading the world in overall production as of 2018.
    Like the tomato, the potato is a nightshade in the genus Solanum, and the vegetative and fruiting parts of the potato contain the toxin solanine which is dangerous for human consumption. Normal potato tubers that have been grown and stored properly produce glycoalkaloids in amounts small enough to be negligible to human health, but if green sections of the plant (namely sprouts and skins) are exposed to light, the tuber can accumulate a high enough concentration of glycoalkaloids to affect human health.[10]
  • Fruit : In botany, a fruit is the seed-bearing structure in flowering plants that is formed from the ovary after flowering.
    Fruits are the means by which flowering plants (also known as angiosperms) disseminate their seeds. Edible fruits in particular have long propagated using the movements of humans and animals in a symbiotic relationship that is the means for seed dispersal for the one group and nutrition for the other; in fact, humans and many animals have become dependent on fruits as a source of food. Consequently, fruits account for a substantial fraction of the world's agricultural output, and some (such as the apple and the pomegranate) have acquired extensive cultural and symbolic meanings.
    In common language usage, “fruit” normally means the fleshy seed-associated structures (or produce) of plants that typically are sweet or sour and edible in the raw state, such as apples, bananas, grapes, lemons, oranges, and strawberries. In botanical usage, the term “fruit” also includes many structures that are not commonly called “fruits”, such as nuts, bean pods, corn kernels, tomatoes, and wheat grains.
  • Lemon : The lemon (Citrus limon) is a species of small evergreen tree in the flowering plant family Rutaceae, native to Asia, primarily Northeast India (Assam), Northern Myanmar or China.
    The tree's ellipsoidal yellow fruit is used for culinary and non-culinary purposes throughout the world, primarily for its juice, which has both culinary and cleaning uses. The pulp and rind are also used in cooking and baking. The juice of the lemon is about 5% to 6% citric acid, with a pH of around 2.2, giving it a sour taste. The distinctive sour taste of lemon juice makes it a key ingredient in drinks and foods such as lemonade and lemon meringue pie.

Potential cookware or bakeware items for your recipe

Below are cookware or bakeware items that might be needed for this Angel Hair Pasta with Lemon, Fingerling Potatoes and Sunflower Greens recipe or similar recipes. If certain kitchen tools don't apply, then simply skip to the next one.

  • Cooking pots
  • Frying pan
  • Steamers
  • Colander
  • Skillet
  • Knives
  • Cutting board
  • Grater
  • Saucepan
  • Stockpot
  • Spatula
  • Tongs
Chef Antonio

Chef Antonio

Chef Antonio has deep family roots in Italy. He spent summers living in Rome with his nona which developed his passion for cooking and expertise in preparing traditional Italian dishes. Antonio has two girls, one boy and a dog that he loves to cook for daily!

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